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Past events hosted within or of interest to the Department are listed here (upto 1 year ago). Visit our main Events page to see upcoming events.


  • 08Feb

    Speaker: Dr Mengfan Guo, Department of Materials Science & Metallurgy, University of Cambridge

    25 minutes plus questions unless stated otherwise (please arrive a few minutes early to start on time)

  • 01Feb

    Speaker: Dr Lutz Kirste, Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics (IAF), Freiburg, Germany.

    http://talks.cam.ac.uk/talk/index/211093

  • 25Jan

    Speaker: Professor Bilge Yildiz, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA

    Abstract:

    Exsolution is an effective approach to fabricating oxide-supported metal nanoparticle (electro-)catalysts via phase precipitation out of a host oxide. A fundamental understanding and control of the exsolution kinetics are needed to engineer the size, density and composition of exsolved nanoparticles to obtain higher catalytic activity toward clean energy and fuel conversion reactions, such as in solid oxide fuel and electrolysis cells. Since oxygen release via oxygen vacancy formation in the host oxide is behind oxide reduction and metal exsolution, we hypothesize that the kinetics of metal exsolution should depend on the kinetics of oxygen release. In this work, we probe the surface exsolution kinetics both experimentally and theoretically using thin-film perovskite oxide model systems, show its relation to the oxygen evolution kinetics, and tune it by external drivers including elastic strain and ion irradiation. Using both drivers, we couple to the formation of point defects and defect clusters, that serve as nucleation sites for nanoparticle exsolution. As a result, we can controllably tune size, density, composition and position of the exsolved metal nanoparticles. This finding can guide the design of exsolution electrocatalysts to advance the performance and durability of solid oxide electrochemical cells.

    http://talks.cam.ac.uk/talk/index/211003

  • 25Jan

    Speaker: Dr Remko Fermin, Department of Materials Science & Metallurgy, University of Cambridge

    Abstract:
    Generally, superconductivity and magnetism are two antagonistic processes. However, advances of the last 20 years have shown that, utilizing non-collinear magnetic layers or spin-orbit coupling, unconventional supercurrents can be generated that can penetrate ferromagnets over long length scales (so called long-range spin-triplet supercurrents). Even though the alternative generation of spin-triplet supercurrents using magnetic structures, such as domain walls and vortices, has been the subject of intense theoretical discussions, the relevant experiments remain scarce. During this talk, I will present our results on nanostructured Josephson junctions with a highly controllable spin texture, based on disk- and ellipse-shaped Nb/Co bilayers. We use the vortex magnetization of the cobalt in disk-shaped junctions to induce long-range triplet (LRT) superconductivity in the ferromagnet. Surprisingly, the LRT correlations emerge in highly localized (sub-80 nm) channels at the rim of the ferromagnet, despite its trivial band structure. We show that these robust rim currents arise from the magnetization texture acting as an effective spin–orbit coupling, which results in spin accumulation at the bilayer–vacuum boundary. Our approach, that combines micromagnetic modeling with microstructured SF-hybrids, presents a novel route towards studying effective spin-orbit coupling of magnetic textures, LRT generation and, realizing superconducting memory applications.

    25 minutes plus questions unless stated otherwise (please arrive a few minutes early to start on time)

  • 23Nov

    Speaker: Dr. Gina Greenidge, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, UK.

    Abstract: 

    The interaction between metals and carbon has been of significant scientific and technological interest for hundreds of years. This work reports novel metallurgical methods to synthesize various carbon architectures for sustainable applications. Porous graphite was prepared by dealloying SiC in molten germanium and then excavating the Ge phase. Dealloying is a technique whereby nanoporous materials are produced via the selective dissolution of one or more components from an alloy. Here, the liquid metal dealloying (LMD) process was extended to non-metal precursors, demonstrating that carbide-derived carbons (CDCs) can be fabricated by this process. The dealloying depth, concentration profile, and length scale of the dealloyed microstructure were examined as they varied with immersion times and temperatures. The dealloying depth h varied with time as h ~ t1/2, and we also observed a buildup of Si concentration in the germanium in front of the dealloying interface. The porous graphite exhibited three-dimensional connectivity and a high degree of crystallinity, with an I(D)/I(G) ratio of 0.3 for samples dealloyed at the highest temperatures, as determined by Raman spectroscopy. Additionally, we have developed the first study on the preparation and characterization of freestanding nanostructured carbon materials produced by melt spinning nickel-carbon alloys with carbon fractions up to 12 at.% and iron-carbon alloys with carbon fractions of 17 at.%. The carbon was excavated by chemical dissolution of the metal. We performed a detailed study on the precipitation kinetics of carbon in nickel-carbon ribbon. The equilibrium solubility of carbon in Ni is only 2 at.% at the eutectic composition, but we attained metastable solid solubility, observing 2% lattice strain for an alloy spun at a linear velocity of 80 m/s; the lattice distortion was reversed via high temperature heat treatments. We also demonstrated the ability to tune the microstructure of carbon precipitated from the rapidly quenched ribbon by varying the carbon content from 4 – 12 at.% in the precursor and annealing the ribbon at temperatures that ranged from 400 – 1200 ℃. By the step-wise variation of these two parameters, we sequentially transformed amorphous carbon nanospheres into thick, highly crystalline flakes of graphite as determined by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy.

    More information: http://talks.cam.ac.uk/show/index/98965

  • 31Oct

    This symposium marks the opening of the Royce Battery Suite. This suite of equipment is available on open access for the manufacturing and processing of battery materials. It includes a glove box, planetary mixer, centrifuge, freeze dryer, shear mixer, reactor synthesis, digestion reactor and rotary evaporator.

    The Royce Battery Suite will uniquely allow exploration of scalable manufacturing and processing of battery materials, for the translation of novel energy materials into application, bridging the gap between research and industry

    This event will include talks from academic researchers across battery research and spinouts, with lab tours of the Battery Suite.

    Please note that the event will start in the Maxwell Centre and include a visit to the Department of Materials Science & Metallurgy, on the West Cambridge campus.

    https://roycecambridgebatterysuitelaunch.eventbrite.co.uk/

  • 26Oct

    The Royce @ Cambridge Ambient Processing Tool is being used to support the latest research in energy and light. This symposium will bring together academic and commercial researchers to highlight their work.

    https://EnergyandlightsymposiumIV.eventbrite.co.uk

  • 12Oct

    Prof Joe Briscoe, Queen Mary University of London, UK.

    Huge advances have been made in recent years in solar energy conversion from both established technologies such as silicon to emerging photovoltaics such as halide perovskites, and direct solar-to-fuel such as photoelectrochemical water splitting and CO2 reduction. Many of these technologies are either approaching their fundamental efficiency limits, or require new approaches to accelerate efficiency improvements. Here, I will present our work developing new devices based on ferroelectric-photovoltaic and ferroelectric-photocatalyst nanocomposites. Ferroelectrics produce a bulk photovoltaic effect (BPVE) that does not require a semiconductor junction therefore can produce above bandgap photovoltages. However they generally are poor light absorbers with low charge carrier mobilities. Therefore we intend to couple the BPVE with efficient photoabsorbers by intimately combining these materials in nanocomposite films. As a proof-of-concept for this effect we have combined photocatalyst materials such as Fe2O3 with porous ferroelectrics to efficiently couple the two effects together, demonstrating enhanced photocatalytic activity driven by the ferroelectric polarisation. We have also demonstrated a strain dependence of the BPVE in epitaxial BaTiO3 thin films, which has implications for optimisation of nanocomposite structures.

    More information: http://talks.cam.ac.uk/show/index/98965

     

  • 12Oct

    The workshop will cover the complete suite of material property measurement systems offered by Quantum Design.  The first day will highlight the Magnetic Property Measurement System (MPMS3), Physical Property Measurement System (PPMS) family, and OptiCool. The second day will focus on the various material measurement techniques and techniques to improve accuracy. 

    https://www.maxwell.cam.ac.uk/events/material-property-measurement-workshop

  • 11Oct

    The workshop will cover the complete suite of material property measurement systems offered by Quantum Design.  The first day will highlight the Magnetic Property Measurement System (MPMS3), Physical Property Measurement System (PPMS) family, and OptiCool. The second day will focus on the various material measurement techniques and techniques to improve accuracy. 

    https://www.maxwell.cam.ac.uk/events/material-property-measurement-workshop